FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

Why choose a registered nutritionist?


Currently national regulations offer no criteria to who can call themselves a Nutritionist. While many practitioners, like Terese have rightfully earned their title through years of tertiary education and clinical practice, some have not. Clinical Nutritionists who are members of the Clinical Nutrition Association have years of tertiary training at an approved institution, hundreds of hours of clinical practice, and annual continued education.




What does holistic mean?


Holistic health looks at more than the physical aspects of a person. It considers emotional, social, mental and environmental aspect of their life and how they may be affecting a persons health and wellbeing.




Does my Southern Cross Health Plan cover clinical nutritionist services?


Yes! If you have Southern Cross Health Insurance, a number of their healthcare plans, such as the Health Essentials, Ultra Care and Body Care Module (which can be added to Wellbeing 1 or Wellbeing 2 policy) enable policy holders to consultations with Nutritionists who are Registered with the Clinical Nutritionist Association - that's me! Contact Southern Cross Health Society for eligibility and more details.




What do I need to bring to my first appointment?


When you come to your initial consultation, please bring with you any supplements and/or medications you are currently taking. For more details go to What To Expect.




How often do I need a follow-up appointment?


Your goals and where you are on your health journey will determine how regularly you should have a follow-up. These sessions are designed to discuss and evaluate how you're getting on with your health plan and make any adjustments and recommendations as needed. Follow-up appointments every 2-3 weeks is advisable in the beginning and then every 4 weeks until your health is back on track. Checking in for a regular 6-month health-check is a good idea for preventative health. Don't wait unitl disease creaps in to take care of yourself!




What's the difference between a Nutritionist and Dietician?


Currently, national New Zealand regulations offer no criteria to who can call themselves a Nutritionist. While many practitioners, like me, have rightfully earned their title through years of tertiary education and clinical practice, some have not.

Clinical Nutritionists who are members of the Clinical Nutrition Association (such as me), have years of tertiary training at an approved institution, hundreds of hours of clinical practice, and annual continued education. Nutritionist normally work more holistically than Dietitians, assessing a person's whole being, not just their nutrition intake.

Dietitians can also be Nutritionists. Nutritionists need further postgraduate training to become Dietitians. Dietitians must be registered to practice dietetics in New Zealand. Dietitians work in clinical situations such as hospitals, private practice, Public Health Organisations, and community settings.